Carlos Ramirez-Rosa

My name is Carlos Ramirez-Rosa, and I am the Alderman of the 35th ward in the City of Chicago, and I do what I do because I love Chicago. Chicago has such a rich history, so much diversity, and it is made up of working people from all across the globe.

Long-time residents and first-generation Chicagoans all want the same thing: they want a better life. I’m deeply committed to making sure that we have a city and a nation that is just, where everyone can live their life with dignity where no one has to worry about where they’re going to get their next meal or where they’re going to sleep at night.

I think that government and the public sector have a responsibility towards delivering on those rights and ensuring that every single person has the life that they deserve, one where they can pursue happiness and enjoy the richness of life.

Carlos Ramirez-Rosa
As long as you have an education, you can make great change in the world.

 

 

My parents were Chicago Public School educators, and they would always tell me you can lose everything you have and get everything taken away from you, but as long as you have an education, you can make great change in the world. They instilled in me the importance of having a public school system that is fully funded and that provides children with the opportunity to learn and grow. Our public schools are the great engine of opportunity in our nation, and they are the great equalizer in our democracy.

My parents were very keen on making sure that I understood not only the importance of public services and programming but also the importance of acting on my values. At age three I attended my first rally with my parents in Springfield, IL to demand a fully funded CPS system. It left a profound impact on me because I saw working families band together to demand justice and since then I have made it my life’s work to fight for social justice in our city, state, and country.

Scott Jaburek

When I came out in high school I learned very quickly that in order to create the world that we want to live in or to build a community that is necessary to do that takes organizing. Ever since then I’ve devoted my life to doing just that.

When I was younger, I first organized spaces to teach LGBTQ safety in schools. In my current capacity, I work with the office of the 35th Ward Alderman as the Ward Superintendent though the Department of Streets & Sanitation and I also organize with friends and various community organizations around different causes and struggles. It has been through this work that I’ve become really clear about how communities across different parts of the city experience or struggle with many injustices and are treated differently and are given different attention based on whether or not they have money.

 

 

Scott Jaburek
A community shouldn’t have to wait for rich people to live there in order for it to be a place where people want to live

When I think about why I wake up in the morning and go to work it’s because I am motivated by those movements and I don’t think that our communities should have to wait for the resources they deserve or face discrimination or be exploited. A community shouldn’t have to wait for rich people to live there in order for it to be a place where people want to live and where people can live in a clean place or place where their sidewalks are inaccessible because they have large holes in them or streets that are riddled with potholes they bust your tire driving down the street.

So that’s been really rewarding for me. And that’s why I keep doing it. I’ve seen how rewarding it is to me personally to take part in movements. It’s what inspires me and makes me grow and makes me think.

Anthony Joel Quezada

I do what I do because of my upbringing in Logan Square, I was born and raised here. I’m the son of two working class immigrants and I remember how hard it was growing up in my community and seeing my parents work their asses off working 60, 70, 80 hours a week and despite them working so hard we still lived in poverty.

 

 

There were times when we had to hide from the landlord because we didn’t have enough money to pay our rent on time or when we had to go on payment plans for our utility bills. I didn’t like seeing my parents go through these struggles and I saw how it made them feel exhausted, ashamed, and stressed. It also wasn’t just a story or experience within my family alone, it was all the families on my block, it was all the families in my community, we all struggled.

William Drew
I didn’t like seeing my parents go through these struggles and I saw how it made them feel exhausted, ashamed, and stressed.

I was forced to deepen my political awareness and class consciousness in my late teens when there was fear of displacement and gentrification in the community due to unaffordable, luxury housing developments. I wanted to get involved to help mitigate those effects and to also find a way to help uplift my family and my community out of poverty. That’s when I had my first experience with electoral politics and with local government through ex-Alderman Joe Moreno of the 1st Ward. It was my experience with him that I learned about the power of money in politics, corruption, and the insatiable greed of luxury developers.

Ever since that experience I’ve committed myself to get rid of corruption and the power of money out of our democracy and to end the grotesque level of wealth and income inequalities that exist in our society.

Jessica Vasquez

I do the work that I do because I feel I have a moral imperative to do good and to stand in solidarity with the oppressed and disenfranchised. I believe in civic responsibility and I believe in public service. My entire adult life I’ve worked for nonprofit advocacy organizations and public service entities. It is important for me to invest my time and energy in making sure that equity and justice are at the center of our public life.

 

 

Jessica Vasquez.
I feel I have a moral imperative to do good and to stand in solidarity with the oppressed and disenfranchised.

William Drew

My parents immigrated from Colombia. My father grew up in poverty as did my mother, and they came to this country undocumented to seek a better and safer life. My parents did not get their citizenship until the mid-90s. My father got his citizenship after a very long legal battle. My mother was lucky. She got her documents through the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, but for a while, I was in a mixed-status family and we lived in fear.

 

 

 

Anthony Joel Quezada
We need humane immigration policies, we need a living wage, and we need investment in our public services to help “pull” each other up, not just ourselves.

As a kid, I saw my parents struggle, not only because of their status at the time, but also because they worked multiple jobs to make ends meet. Both worked day and night to provide for our family, and I learned very early on that “pulling yourself up by your bootstraps” doesn’t work if our legal and political systems are unjust. We need humane immigration policies, we need a living wage, and we need investment in our public services to help “pull” each other up, not just ourselves.

Alderman Carlos Ramirez-Rosa | 35th Ward
2934 N. Milwaukee Chicago, IL 60618
Office: 773-887-3772
aldermancarlosrosa.org